Author Archives: jgisondi

About jgisondi

I am the author of the "Field Guide To Covering Sports," the second edition now available from Congressional Quarterly Press/SAGE, and "Monster Trek: The Obsessive Search for Bigfoot" (U of Nebraska Press). Field Guide to Covering Sports, Second Edition goes beyond general guidance about sports writing, offering readers practical advice on covering 20 specific sports. From auto racing to wrestling, author Joe Gisondi gives tips on the seemingly straightforward—like where to stand on the sideline and how to identify a key player—along with the more specialized—such as figuring out shot selection in lacrosse and understanding a coxswain’s call for a harder stroke in rowing. In the new Second Edition, readers also explore sports reporting across multimedia platforms, developing a foundational understanding for social media, mobile media, visual storytelling, writing for television and radio, and applying sabermetrics. Fully revised with new examples and updated information to give readers confidence in covering just about any game, match, meet, race, regatta or tournament, Field Guide to Covering Sports, Second Edition is the ideal go-to resource to have on hand when mastering the beat. In "Monster Trek," Joe Gisondi brings to life the celebrities in bigfoot culture: people such as Matt Moneymaker, Jeff Meldrum, and Cliff Barackman, who explore remote wooded areas of the country for weeks at a time and spend thousands of dollars on infrared imagers, cameras, and high-end camping equipment. Pursuing the answer to why these seekers of bigfoot do what they do, Gisondi brings to the reader their most interesting—and in many cases, harrowing—expeditions. You can order both from Amazon.

What rule changes would make the XFL more attractive to fans?

Looks like Vince McMahon might roll out XFL 2.0, which will be announced later this afternoon. Fans love football, but they have dismissed the World Football League, the United States Football League and the XFL’s first rendition during the past … Continue reading

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Statistical analysis can be far more fun than beat coverage

If you’re interested in diving into the statistical side of sports coverage, look no further than FiveThirtyEight, which offers compelling analysis that’s clearly articulated. You can find top-notch analysis at FanGraphs, Beyond the Boxscore, and FootballOutsiders.com. You can also regularly find fantastic coverage … Continue reading

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‘Morning Joe’ interview with Congressman can be a lesson for sports journalists as well

I’m not trying to wade into politics here – although I’ll gladly discuss my second fave topic elsewhere – but this interview with a Texas Congressman can serve to teach all journalists how to address sources who attack, deflect, obfuscate and … Continue reading

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Here’s my sports journalism syllabus for the spring semester

I’ve never taught any class exactly the same way. So it’s no surprise that I have changed the syllabus for my sports writing class in order to reflect changes in the industry during the past few years, which are resonated … Continue reading

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Register now for this amazing sports journalism workshop

Granted, I am a bit biased since I have been involved with the CMI Sports Reporting Workshop since its inception five years ago, but you won’t find a more impressive list of sports media professionals anywhere.

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LISTEN: Should sports journalists like Jemele Hill offer their political views, such as calling President Trump a ‘white supremacist’

Did ESPN’s Jemele Hill have the right to call President Donald Trump a white supremacist on her personal Twitter account? Do sports journalists need to check their personal opinions on social media? Check out this week’s podcast. -30-

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College football programs try to control message, but they have only themselves to blame – not the media – for game performances

Notre Dame athletics is the most recent sports organization that just doesn’t understand how to work with the media – and, thus, to grow popularity and revenue. Instead of embracing coverage, Notre Dame decided to dictate strict, inhibiting – and, … Continue reading

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