Sports Media Education

Sports conference offers training, tips about media from pros

Screen Shot 2015-12-11 at 10.23.47 AMStudents and advisers representing 59 colleges and universities from Alaska to New York gathered in Nashville last year for an immersive two-day sports media experience they will never forget. This year’s event is bigger and better and will sell out quickly, so make your plans to attend soon.

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Teaching sports journalism

Correcting mistakes made by inexperienced sports writing students

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You can create some great writing exercises by using materials offered on sites such as MLB.com.

Students interested in writing journalistically – sports or otherwise – invariably take similar approaches and make comparable mistakes.

Language tends to be the biggest challenge for many students, whether that means a reliance on clichés and jargon, an inability to write precisely or concisely, or an overusage of inflated and hyperbolic language to display key moments or trends in games.

Let’s address some of those related to an exercise I developed for my sports journalism course. Continue reading

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College Media, Sports Language

Quick Takes: Avoid cliches like the (zombie) plague

A few quick-takes while reading college sports media across the country.

sufferNot a big fan of teams ‘suffering losses’ regardless if defeat is by 1 point or 49 points, unless players got hurt during the game. You can see the definitions of suffer in the picture to the right that includes the following descriptions: “to feel pain or distress” and to be subjected to “anything unpleasant,””and to “experience.” But these definitions are really indicating real physical and mental pain. If a team is truly suffering, then use this word – but then you must also investigate and offer that story line. Don’t use ‘suffering’ blithely or the word will lose its meaning and become yet another meaningless sports cliche. Continue reading

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