Teaching Journal: Writing about live sports events

Through the semester, I’ll offer observations from my own sports (and sometimes news writing) classes that could prove helpful for both students and teachers.

Assignment: Students wrote stories based upon the football exercise in the second edition of the Field Guide To Covering Sports (pp. 365-367).

Observations: Students developed leads that were general, which is often the case since they are often taught to take this approach in essays by most teachers from K-12. As a result, my students focused on leads about “regulation ending in a scoreless tie” or merely that Cocoa defeated Tallahassee Godby, 7-6, in a state title game.

Continue reading “Teaching Journal: Writing about live sports events”

What questions do sports journalism students want answered?

So what do journalism students know, and, further, what do they want to learn?

That’s a primary concern for most educators like myself.

So I set out to ask students attending this week’s College Media Mega Workshop in Minneapolis that exact question.

Continue reading “What questions do sports journalism students want answered?”

Correcting mistakes made by inexperienced sports writing students

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You can create some great writing exercises by using materials offered on sites such as MLB.com.

Students interested in writing journalistically – sports or otherwise – invariably take similar approaches and make comparable mistakes.

Language tends to be the biggest challenge for many students, whether that means a reliance on clichés and jargon, an inability to write precisely or concisely, or an overusage of inflated and hyperbolic language to display key moments or trends in games.

Let’s address some of those related to an exercise I developed for my sports journalism course. Continue reading “Correcting mistakes made by inexperienced sports writing students”