Rubrics help teachers, students focus on key elements of journalism

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Anybody who works as a journalist realizes there are essentially two kinds of stories – those that either pass or fail, that either inform and/or entertain readers fully or that lack depth, sources, context, skill. Anybody who teaches journalism realizes we can’t really grade in this manner. To that end, I typically create rubrics for courses that address advanced reporting, sports writing and feature writing in order to offer more specific instruction on how to improve. Rubrics can remind students on the elements included in good journalism.

Continue reading “Rubrics help teachers, students focus on key elements of journalism”

Correcting mistakes made by inexperienced sports writing students

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You can create some great writing exercises by using materials offered on sites such as MLB.com.

Students interested in writing journalistically – sports or otherwise – invariably take similar approaches and make comparable mistakes.

Language tends to be the biggest challenge for many students, whether that means a reliance on clichés and jargon, an inability to write precisely or concisely, or an overusage of inflated and hyperbolic language to display key moments or trends in games.

Let’s address some of those related to an exercise I developed for my sports journalism course. Continue reading “Correcting mistakes made by inexperienced sports writing students”